Adding an input to the Quickie

ashok · 14624

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Offline ashok

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on: November 03, 2009, 05:09:48 AM
Hi all,

First, a big hello to all the members here! I have been reading the old Bottlehead forum (over on AA) for a few years now, although I don't believe I ever posted in it.

I am considering the Quickie, and wanted to find out if any one here has added an extra set of inputs to it. Drilling the acrylic is going to be a little tricky, I think, and if there are any tips that might help me, I would certainly appreciate the advise.

I am planning to use a rotary selector switch in place of the DPDT.

Thanks very much.

Ashok



Offline Len

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Reply #1 on: November 03, 2009, 05:38:07 AM
Hi all,

First, a big hello to all the members here! I have been reading the old Bottlehead forum (over on AA) for a few years now, although I don't believe I ever posted in it.

I am considering the Quickie, and wanted to find out if any one here has added an extra set of inputs to it. Drilling the acrylic is going to be a little tricky, I think, and if there are any tips that might help me, I would certainly appreciate the advise.

I am planning to use a rotary selector switch in place of the DPDT.

Thanks very much.

Ashok

Hey Ashok. Welcome.

I've been drilling holes all over the Quickie, but so far only 1/8" in diameter. I've been using a portable drill/electric screwdriver with a sharp drill bit. One of those with the recharge-a-pack that slaps into the pistol grip. Mine has torque settings (that are not used for drilling). The inherently low speed is controlled with trigger pressure, so it's very controllable. If you think you might have a problem breaking out the far end of the plate, I would suggest starting from the top side. Just hold the plate firmly on a piece of scrap wood, go real slow and use almost no pressure when you get to the end.

Also, if you have a drill with 140 degree tip angle instead of the usual 118 degree, then the drill would be guided for longer in the plate, making it easier. Also a low spiral drill would grab the plate less. But all that said, I haven't had a problem with a regular hardware store drill.

If you don't mind an extra hole, you could practice under one of the 9V battery holders first.

Hope this helps.

Paramours
Paraglows
Excites
Heavily modded Soul Sister and Groove Thang
Quickie modded to active low pass filter
Quickie modded to headphone amp
Lots of Bottlehead parts used for building other stuff


Offline ashok

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Reply #2 on: November 03, 2009, 05:53:27 AM
Len,

Thanks, it does help. I do have a stepped unibit, which I will probably use, and some spare acrylic from another project that will serve as practice material.

Ashok



Offline Paul Birkeland

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Reply #3 on: November 03, 2009, 08:37:06 AM
The stepped bit is probably not a good idea.  A 3/8" forstner bit or a 3/8" bit made for drilling acrylic will give you better results.  (High speed low pressure is the key)

There is also a DP3T toggle switch at Digikey that would drop in for the stock selector switch and give you the extra position you desire. 

-Paul

Paul "PB" Birkeland

Bottlehead Grunt & The Repro Man


Offline Skip Pack

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Reply #4 on: November 04, 2009, 05:04:04 AM
There are specialized drill bits for acrylic. The one I have works very well.
The have a rounded, gradual taper on the point. Of course, over time,
each new hole you need will be a different size. I got mine at TAP Plastics.

General tips are to tape the point on both sides before drilling (I use
masking tape), and support the acrylic on a piece of sacrificial wood.
Acrylic seems to become more brittle over time, so a hole that drills
cleanly this year may break out badly if you want to drill another next
year.

Skip



Offline ashok

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Reply #5 on: November 04, 2009, 06:21:06 AM
Thanks for the tips, everyone. I will check out the special drill bits for acrylic.

True DP3T switches seem to be quite expensive - an NKK switch at Mouser is around $15. It has the required 8 contacts to choose one circuit from among three different circuits.

Ashok



Offline Lee Hankins

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Reply #6 on: November 04, 2009, 06:27:47 AM
The easiest way to drill through the acrylic without using special bits is to just start with a 1/16" bit and enlarge the hole by using progressive (I use 1/16' increases) larger bits, also works when drilling through a painted top plate without chipping the paint.  Slower drill speed is better and if room is available use two sided tape on the supporting block of wood, the tighter the wood is to the underside the better the outcome will be.

Lee Hankins
"End of the Road"
Homer, Alaska


Offline Grainger49

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Reply #7 on: November 04, 2009, 06:29:47 AM
Ith (did I get that right?), I am going to have to drill a painted plate soon.  Thanks for the tip.



Offline Len

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Reply #8 on: November 04, 2009, 06:59:48 AM
The easiest way to drill through the acrylic without using special bits is to just start with a 1/16" bit and enlarge the hole by using progressive (I use 1/16' increases) larger bits, also works when drilling through a painted top plate without chipping the paint.  Slower drill speed is better and if room is available use two sided tape on the supporting block of wood, the tighter the wood is to the underside the better the outcome will be.

I don't do that much acrylic, but if the pilot hole is too big in metal or wood, then there is usually the danger of the drill grabbing, since it can move off center and only cut with one flute.

There is a trick to using a pilot hole that many people don't seem to know. You choose a pilot drill that is the same diameter as the web of the big drill. That way the big drill does not have to drill with the "dead" spot, and will blow right through the work.

Just my 2 cents.
« Last Edit: November 04, 2009, 08:10:36 AM by Len »

Paramours
Paraglows
Excites
Heavily modded Soul Sister and Groove Thang
Quickie modded to active low pass filter
Quickie modded to headphone amp
Lots of Bottlehead parts used for building other stuff


Offline Paul Birkeland

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Reply #9 on: November 04, 2009, 07:52:10 AM
The easiest way to drill through the acrylic without using special bits is to just start with a 1/16" bit and enlarge the hole by using progressive (I use 1/16' increases) larger bits...  Slower drill speed is better

This is 100% contrary to my experience, unless you are using forstner bits (they are OK on low speeds).  The slow speeds and the different hole sizes will induce an elevated risk of grabbing, which will either crack the plate or throw it off your working surface. 

I still feel the expensive DP3T switch is a good way to go.  A rotary switch and additional tools to make it all work will be similar in cost.

Paul "PB" Birkeland

Bottlehead Grunt & The Repro Man


Offline bainjs

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Reply #10 on: November 07, 2009, 01:17:59 AM
I added a rotary switch to the base and fed it to one of the inputs using very short interconnects.  See my photos on the old forum discussion.  Let me know if any questions.

Joel

Joel Bain


Offline Grainger49

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Reply #11 on: November 07, 2009, 04:29:00 AM
I added a rotary switch to the base and fed it to one of the inputs using very short interconnects.  See my photos on the old forum discussion.  Let me know if any questions.

Joel

I like the base mounting idea.  That removes all the danger of drilling the acrylic top and makes for a nice look as well.  Poster pRC has a FP 2 with the stereo volume control in the front.  Cool look!